Pete Iannetta

Co-existence with GM crops in European Agriculture

SIGMEA logoThe EU project SIGMEA is examining the feasibility of growing GM and other crops together in the agricultural landscapes of Europe. A central part of the project - Workpackage 2 or WP2 - collates and analyses experimental studies on geneflow by seed and pollen, but also considers field experiments on the ecological impacts of GM cropping. WP2 has over 20 partners who are sharing and analysing definitive data on over 100 field experiments, making the SIGMEA database the most comprehensive of its type. The agroecology group at SCRI co-ordinates this unique synthesis of biology and agronomy. Contact: Geoff Squire

Movement and Persistence of Genes in the Environment

Image of feral oilseed rape growing alongside a new field of oilseed rapeThe movements of genes and organisms over the landscape are natural processes that came to public attention in the assessment of GM crops. Issues on gene and seed movement go beyond the GM debate, and indeed, the major current research here on geneflow uses non-GM markers. The group combines statistical, molecular, genetic, mathematical and ecological skills to investigate the movement of genetic material and its consequences. It maintains large study areas in Tayside and in England in which it tracks the occurrence and persistence of volunteers, ferals and wild relatives.

Research projects

Research has developed in this topic for more than ten years through a series of projects funded from Europe, the UK and Scotland and from the research councils in collaboration with universities. Our contributions over this period include:

Ecological biosafety and gene flow

Image of Laying out field experiment in the Carse of GowrieThe agroecology group at SCRI continues to make major contributions through research and extension to questions on GM crops. We examine their potential roles in cropping systems, their positive and negative environmental effects, the movement of genetic material through pollen and seed and the  means by which GM and other crops might coexist in European agriculture. We combine knowledge of biology, modelling and molecular science to answer some of the most important topical questions in ecological biosafety. All our findings are made public. Members of the group are regularly invited to advise national and international commissions in biosafety and to develop training methods for environmental risk assessment.

Environment Plant Interactions

Image of the SCRI site looking towards the River TaySCRI's environmental science research spans across disciplines to gain a holistic understanding of how plants respond to and modify environmental processes. Scottish Government commissioned research is gaining an in-depth understanding of the environment in arable farming systems and this is being used to advise on policy development in Scotland. These skills have also been applied to emerging issues relevant to the UK and Europe, including the UK’s Farm Scale Evaluations, international working groups, IPDM-based alternatives to pesicides and EU-wide studies on the ecological impacts of GM plants.

The environment and the ecology of plants and pests are our key research areas, investigated by a strong multidisciplinary team of scientists in entomology, pathology, plant sciences, vegetation ecology, phytochemistry, mathematical modelling and soil sciences. A major area of interest is integrating processes that occur above ground and in the soil. Research conducted on plant interactions with soil has extended from the understanding of sustainable arable systems to ‘green’ engineering solutions for slope stabilisation with vegetation.

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